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Is not filling San Antonio jobs resulting in lost productivity?

December 2nd, 2014

A new survey from Indeed finds that the economic costs of unfilled San Antonio jobs, among other locations across the nation, result in lost productivity.

The loss is nearly $160B annually.

Of this amount, over half represent unearned wages (around 55%), with the remainder attributed to unearned profits. For the top 10 companies in Dow Jones Index, the combined cost of not filling open jobs for one month equals more than $75M in monthly gross domestic product (GDP).

While total employment has now almost caught up to its pre-recessionary peak with over 2M jobs being created in the first nine months of 2014, labor market participation has fallen to its lowest level in decades. A large number of unfilled, open roles may well cause problems for the economy in the years ahead.

There are a number of industry sectors in which unfilled jobs have greater impact due to the higher levels of contributed economic value, including finance, insurance, and professional services. These industries alone collectively represent over $4B GDP (GDP, a measure of goods and services produced within an economy and the income generated by that economy) in a typical month.

For the wider economy, the efficient matching of potential employees to businesses through the labor market is key to supporting healthy levels of employment and household incomes, while allowing businesses to reach full productivity.

“For today’s job seekers, these are near-perfect conditions, however, at almost $160 billion per year, the cost of unfilled roles should serve as a wake-up call to US businesses developing recruitment strategies in a post-recession environment.

“Each ‘empty desk’ represents an opportunity both for the individual and the business. For the business, finding and recruiting the right individual means better productivity and profits, while for the individual, earning an income and spending a salary contributes to wide economic growth. In today’s economic environment of lowered unemployment and labor participation, it has never been more important to hire the right fit for each role.”

Outlook strong for San Antonio jobs

December 1st, 2014

A new Manpower survey posits that the outlook for Texas jobs, and also for San Antonio jobs, looks strong.

According to Manpower, the fourth quarter research shows that U.S. employers anticipate hiring intentions to stay relatively stable quarter-over-quarter across all regions, and increase slightly compared to one year ago at this time. Three regions report the strongest Outlooks in more than six years:

Employers in the Midwest report a Net Employment Outlook of +15%, which is the strongest since Quarter 4 2007 when the Outlook was +18%.
Employers in the South report a Net Employment Outlook of +15%, which is the strongest since Quarter 2 2008 when the Outlook was +17%.
Employers in the West report a Net Employment Outlook of +16%, which is the strongest since Quarter 1 2008 when the Outlook was +22%.

Employers have a positive Outlook in all 13 industry sectors included in the survey, with Leisure & Hospitality, Mining and Wholesale & Retail Trade employers reporting the strongest hiring intentions.

Among the 50 states, employers in North Dakota, Arizona, Mississippi, Texas and Wisconsin indicate the strongest Net Employment Outlooks, while Alaska, Maine, New Jersey and Arkansas project the weakest Outlooks.

Among employers in the 100 largest metropolitan statistical areas, the strongest job prospects are expected in:

Dallas
Houston, Texas
McAllen, Texas
Phoenix, Ariz.
San Jose, Calif.

U.S. employers report the strongest Net Employment Outlook since Quarter 1 2008, when the Outlook was +16%. The Quarter 4 2014 Net Employment Outlook of +15% is up from +14% in Quarter 3 2014 and from +13% during Quarter 4 2013.

Of the more than 18,000 U.S. employers surveyed, 19 percent anticipate an increase in staff levels in their Quarter 4 2014 hiring plans, while anticipated staff reductions are consistent with past fourth quarter results at 7 percent. Seventy-two percent of employers expect no change in their hiring plans. The final 2 percent of employers are undecided about their hiring intentions, resulting in a Net Employment Outlook of +12%.

Are their wage disparities with people who hold San Antonio jobs?

November 9th, 2014

Men and women with San Antonio jobs may have wage disparities that are significant, according to a survey from Monster.com.

Monster in conjunction with the WageIndicator Foundation, today released data regarding wage disparities among men and women in the United States and Europe.

The data collected determined that on average, men’s wages are 22-29% higher than women’s. In taking a closer look, the data also shows that U.S. men in supervisory positions make up to 42% higher wages, on average, than their women counterparts.

Country-specific findings include:

United States

In the U.S., on average female workers earn 29% lower wages than males.
While there were “only” 4 percentage points fewer female respondents who claimed to work in supervisory positions, wages for male supervisors showed to be 42% higher than females.

United Kingdom

In the UK, female workers earn 22% lower wages on average.
While women workers in the UK can expect an average 22% wage increase if promoted to a supervisory position, male supervisors earn more than 40% higher wages than their non-supervisor counterparts.
Male supervisors in the UK earn 45% more than female supervisors.
UK male workers also receive more generous tenure-related wage increases: women can expect 38% higher wages after 10+ years in their profession, while men receive 60% higher wages after the same amount of time, when compared to labor market entrants.

Spain

In Spain, female workers earn 26% lower wages than males.
After spending ten years in their profession, Spanish men can expect a full 100% increase in wages, while Spanish women earn a 75% increase after the same amount of time.
Spanish male workers in supervisory positions also earn 35% more than their female counterparts.

Germany

In Germany, female workers earn 23% lower wages than males.
Raises for tenure and/or increased responsibility are distributed somewhat more evenly: German men in supervisory roles earn 16% more than their women counterparts, and there is almost no difference (0.4%) in the amount a male worker’s wages are increased after 10+ years in their profession over the increase a woman worker can expect.

Respondents to the survey were from different age groups, varied industries, and various hierarchical positions in their respective occupations. The data allowed analysts to determine the greatest gender gaps by industry. The highest gaps appeared in the Healthcare, Finance and Insurance, Legal, and Education and Research fields. These fields show women earning between 35% and 43% less than men, respectively.

Examining feedback from the US, UK, Spain and Germany, on average:

Healthcare: females earn 34% less
Finance & Insurance: females earn 35% less
Legal: females earn 40% less
Education & Research: females earn 33% less

Company hiring for seasonal jobs in San Antonio

November 2nd, 2014

Amazon is hiring thousands for seasonal jobs in San Antonio, among other locations across the country.

The online retail giant has more than 50 fulfillment centers in the U.S. and will have more than 15 sortation centers by the end of 2014.

The new network of sortation centers is fueling a range of innovations like Sunday delivery, later cut-off ordering times for customers and the ability to control packages deeper into the delivery process.

Amazon is creating 80,000 seasonal positions across its U.S. network of fulfillment and sortation centers this holiday season in order to meet an increase in customer demand.

For its regular, full-time fulfillment center positions, Amazon offers competitive hourly wages and a comprehensive benefits package, including healthcare, 401(k) and company stock awards.

Amazon also offers regular full-time employees programs like Career Choice, where it will pre-pay up to 95 percent of tuition for courses related to in-demand fields, regardless of whether the skills are relevant to a career at Amazon. Since the program’s launch, employees are pursuing degrees in game design and visual communications, nursing, IT programming and radiology, to name a few.

“So far this year, we have converted more than 10,000 seasonal employees in the U.S. into regular, full-time roles and we’re looking forward to converting thousands more across our growing network of fulfillment and sortation centers after this holiday season,” said Mike Roth, Amazon’s vice president of North America operations. “We’re excited to be creating 80,000 seasonal jobs, thousands of which will lead to regular, full-time roles with benefits starting on day one and innovative programs like Career Choice for employees to further pursue their education.”

Company hires for retail jobs in San Antonio

October 25th, 2014

Kohl’s said recently it is hiring for big for retail jobs in San Antonio, among other locations.

“Kohl’s is building a winning team by hiring more than 67,000 seasonal associates across the country to ensure we sustain the great service our customers know and have come to expect,” said Richard Schepp, Kohl’s senior executive vice president, human resources and general counsel.

“By adding these associates, Kohl’s will continue to deliver an enjoyable and convenient shopping experience to all our valued customers, whether they choose to shop in store or online at Kohls.com this holiday season.”

Most jobs will be filled by mid-November. Holiday positions are also being filled at the company’s distribution centers, where hiring began in August. Associates working at distribution centers help ensure Kohl’s products get to the retail stores and into the hands of Kohls.com customers.

Kohl’s anticipates hiring an average of 50 associates per store to provide customers with excellent customer service throughout the holiday season at its 1,163 stores in 49 states. In addition, the company anticipates hiring approximately 9,300 seasonal positions at distribution centers across the country and approximately 670 seasonal credit operations positions.

Hiring began this month.

Hiring levels at specific locations will vary depending on the business needs of each facility.

Employers hire for seasonal jobs in San Antonio

October 6th, 2014

Several employers have said in a recent Careerbuilder survey that they plan to hire for seasonal jobs in San Antonio, among other locations.

Nearly three in 10 employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees in the fourth quarter, up four percentage points over last year. One in four expect to hire seasonal workers, including 43 percent of retailers.

Thirty-four percent of employers added full-time, permanent headcount in Q3, up from 28 percent in the same period in 2013. Ten percent decreased headcount – a slight improvement over 11 percent last year – while 54 percent made no change to staff levels and 2 percent were unsure.

About 29 percent of employers plan to add full-time, permanent employees in Q4, up from 25 percent in the same period in 2013. Nine percent expect to reduce staff, on par with last year. Fifty-seven percent anticipate no change and 5 percent are unsure.

wo in five retailers (43 percent) plan to hire seasonal workers in Q4. Last year, 39 percent of retailers had expected to add workers for the holidays.

While retailers typically take center stage when it comes to seasonal employment, companies across industries are looking for extra hands on deck. Twenty-six percent plan to hire seasonal employees in Q4, and 42 percent of these companies expect to transition some seasonal staff members into full-time, permanent roles.

Pay for seasonal workers will increase over last year, according to 27 percent of employers. Thirteen percent anticipate it will decrease. Sixty-three percent of seasonal employers will pay $10 or more per hour while 19 percent will pay $16 or more.

Kohl’s hiring for San Antonio retail jobs

October 1st, 2014

With the holiday season fast-approaching, Kohl’s has announced it is hiring for San Antonio retail jobs, among other locations.

The company is hiring more than 67,000 associates nationwide this holiday season to support seasonal business in stores and growth.

Hiring began this month, and most jobs will be filled by mid-November. Holiday positions are also being filled at the company’s distribution centers, where hiring began in August.

Associates working at distribution centers help ensure Kohl’s products get to the retail stores and into the hands of Kohls.com customers.

Associates working in Kohl’s credit operations perform a variety of jobs, including assisting customers with Kohls.com orders.

Kohl’s anticipates hiring an average of 50 associates per store to provide customers with excellent customer service throughout the holiday season at its 1,163 stores in 49 states.

In addition, the company anticipates hiring approximately 9,300 seasonal positions at distribution centers across the country and approximately 670 seasonal credit operations positions.

“Kohl’s is building a winning team by hiring more than 67,000 seasonal associates across the country to ensure we sustain the great service our customers know and have come to expect,” said Richard Schepp, Kohl’s senior executive vice president, human resources and general counsel. “By adding these associates, Kohl’s will continue to deliver an enjoyable and convenient shopping experience to all our valued customers, whether they choose to shop in store or online at Kohls.com this holiday season.”

Millennials with San Antonio jobs replace boomers

September 25th, 2014

A recent survey from Monster.com shows that people with San Antonio jobs are replacing boomers as the “me” generation in the workplace.

According to the survey, when it comes to having a Career vs. a Job, millennials aged 18-30 are the most positive (62%) that having a career is very much a reality in today’s work environment, even for America’s youngest workers.

Less than half (48%) of the original “Me” generation, baby boomers aged 51+, express confidence in the idea of a career being a reality.

The data suggests an understanding of work that is defined by age and experience, highlighting the contrast of millennials’ hopeful optimism-oriented point of view with baby boomers’ “been around the block” attitudes.

When asked to rate a series of attributes within the workplace to determine if it describes a career, a job or both equally, a majority of Americans indicated both jobs and careers equally provide a sense of personal accomplishment, lifelong earning potential, opportunities to make new contributions, and for alternate employment opportunities in the case of current job loss.

However, the responses varied quite significantly in the context of careers and jobs exclusively.

In the context of only careers, more than one third (37%) of millennials compared to only a quarter (26%) of baby boomers believe that a career provides a sense of accomplishment. In stark comparison, in the context of only jobs, virtually zero millennials, just 2%, believe a job can provide a sense of accomplishment.

Workers with San Antonio jobs unwind after vacation

September 7th, 2014

Some workers who have San Antonio jobs among other locations need several days to unwind and recoup after vacation, according to a recent survey from Monster.com.

Nearly half of respondents (48%) need five or more days to unwind, or never unwind at all, when taking a vacation. Only 11% of respondents unwind after one day.

Monster asked the following question to U.S. visitors on its site, “How many days of vacation does it take you to unwind when taking vacation” The poll, which received over 1,800 responses, resulted in the following findings:

11% of respondents answered “One day”
30% of respondents answered “2-3 days”
11% of respondents answered “4 days”
29% of respondents answered “5 or more days”
19% of respondents answered “I never fully relax on vacation”

Thinking about your job occasionally while on vacation isn’t a bad thing,” said Mary Ellen Slayter, Career Advice Expert for Monster.com. “Just like how we sometimes stumble upon great ideas while in the shower or taking a walk, vacations can be a great source of inspiration- but it’s important to note that being relaxed and having a clear mind are fundamental elements of this phenomenon. Even more importantly, lack of R&R can be detrimental to workplace performance. We should feel refreshed and focused upon returning to work after time off, not burdened and preoccupied. If you are constantly plagued by job related stress and unable to unwind, even after several days of vacation, it might be time to consider making some career changes.”

Are workers without diploma securing transportation jobs in San Antonio?

August 27th, 2014

A new survey from Careerbuilder shows that while unemployment for workers without a high school is high, some of these workers could potentially secure transportation jobs in San Antonio, among other locations.

As of this year, there are 115 occupations that require a high school diploma and pay $20 per hour or more on average.

Of those, 70 percent typically require moderate to long-term on-the-job training or apprenticeships; 30 percent typically require short-term or no on-the-job training.

High-paying occupations for high school graduates aren’t necessarily entry-level jobs. For instance, first-line supervisors, regardless of discipline, typically require 1-5 years of prior work experience.

“While the pursuit of higher education is the best bet for gainful employment, it is a myth that only good jobs go to college graduates and that workers with high school degrees are destined to low-wage careers,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. “It’s important to note, however, that most high-paying jobs available to high school grads involve skill sets that require extensive post-secondary training or several-years’ worth of prior experience, and are often in fields that have seen declining employment in recent years.”
In several of these jobs, workers may need to attend vocational school or other non-college-level training programs to achieve licensure or certification. Additionally, entry-level requirements will vary by state, locality and employer.