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Fair highlights engineering jobs in San Antonio

April 3rd, 2018

A local fair is highlighting youth and engineering jobs in San Antonio.

More than 1,200 Texas middle and high school students will present their outstanding projects at the 2018 Texas Science and Engineering Fair (TXSEF). The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) continues its commitment to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and the success of tomorrow’s workforce by co-sponsoring the event for the 17th consecutive year with ExxonMobil.

“We are proud to support this prestigious event that provides Texas students the platform to demonstrate their significant talents and their commitment to improving the world around them through innovative science solutions,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “The knowledge and experience gained by these future innovators through this exciting competition can inspire them to pursue a rewarding career in high demand STEM fields and prepare them to be the future leaders of our state.”

Hosted by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), the science fair begins with check-in on Friday, March 23, and culminates with judging and an awards presentation on Saturday, March 24, at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center in San Antonio. University of Texas Chemistry Professor Dr. Kate Biberdorf will deliver the keynote address at the awards presentation.

TWC is proud to join ExxonMobil and UTSA in providing a setting in which outstanding students can showcase their research projects in these high-demand industries,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “We applaud the students for the commitment and innovation they demonstrate.”

The Texas Science and Engineering Fair is officially sanctioned by the Society for Science & the Public, the annual host of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Awards will be presented to students in 22 project categories for both middle and high school divisions.

“In an increasingly competitive job market, individuals with hands-on experience in STEM disciplines are highly sought-after,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “It is important that we continue to support the next generation of the Texas labor force by providing them with opportunities like this fair.”

Education jobs in San Antonio added

April 3rd, 2018

A number of new education jobs in San Antonio added.

Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in January and remains below the U.S. unemployment rate of 4.1 percent. The Texas economy added 240,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs over the year, including 16,000 jobs added in January. Annual employment growth for Texas was 2.0 percent in January, marking 93 consecutive months of annual growth.

“Texas employers kicked off 2018 with the addition of 16,000 jobs in January and 240,500 over the year,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Thanks to our state’s world-class employers, diverse industry sectors and highly-talented workforce, Texas continues to be a national leader in job creation and the premier place to do business.”

Industries adding jobs in January included Mining and Logging, which added 3,300 jobs; Education and Health Services, which added 2,800 jobs; and Manufacturing added 2,400 positions.

“Texas’ private-sector employers contributed to another successful month of growth by adding 12,400 jobs in January,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “This growth reflects our state’s strong ability to continuously attract more employers and workers.”

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.4 percent, followed by the Amarillo MSA, which had the second lowest with a rate of 2.8 percent. The Austin-Round Rock MSA had the third lowest rate of 3.0 percent for January.

“The Texas labor market’s 93rd consecutive month of positive annual growth is proof that our Texas workers have much to offer,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez.  “I encourage those looking for career advancements to visit WorkInTexas.com.”

San Antonio jobs added

April 3rd, 2018

A number of new San Antonio jobs have been added, according to recent labor data.

The Texas economy added 40,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs in February, which marked 20 consecutive months of employment growth. Over the year, Texas added 285,200 jobs for an annual employment growth rate 2.3 percent in February. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remained unchanged at 4.0 percent in February and remains below the U.S. unemployment rate of 4.1 percent.

“We are encouraged to see the Texas economy continue to expand at a solid pace with Texas employers adding 40,500 jobs over the month for a total of 285,200 jobs gained over the year,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Texas’ continued addition of jobs demonstrates the competitive advantages and market opportunities available to our employers and world-class workforce to compete and succeed.”

Industries adding jobs in February included Professional and Business Services, which added 13,200 positions followed by Trade, Transportation and Utilities, which added 11,800 jobs, and Mining and Logging employers added 6,500 positions.

“Our businesses in Texas continue to thrive and grow in a strong economy, adding 42,800 jobs in February,” said Commissioner Ruth R. Hughs. “Texas has created an environment for success and continues to support additional business expansion for our broad range of industry employers.”

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.5 percent, followed by the Amarillo MSA, which had the second lowest with a rate of 2.9 percent. The Austin-Round Rock and College Station-Bryan MSAs were tied for the third lowest rate of 3.0 percent for February.

“Our state continues to build on its successes,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “We need to continue these efforts in building a better prepared workforce by continuing to offer training programs and training onsite. Our Skills Development Fund provides training grants to jobs, businesses and workers to fulfill a specific need we see in the workforce. We need to solve the problem of not having enough skilled workers by increasing opportunities for customizing job-training.”

Internship challenge connects students to San Antonio jobs

March 6th, 2018

An internship challenge is connecting students to San Antonio jobs.

Texas’ Tri-Agency partners met with industry and education stakeholders to discuss expansion strategies for the “Texas Internship Challenge,” a statewide campaign to increase and promote internships for students in Texas.

Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) Chairman Andres Alcantar, Texas Commissioner of Education Mike Morath, Texas Commissioner of Higher Education Raymund Paredes, TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth Ruggero Hughs and TWC Labor Commissioner Julian Alvarez were joined by executives from Lockheed Martin Corporation, Accenture, JPMorgan Chase, among other industry and education leaders to discuss specific goals on internship expansion strategies, which include stressing the importance of internships, examining different strategies to grow internships and listening to ways we can expand outreach.

“Internships provide invaluable mentoring which positions our students for future success by increasing their skills, awareness and work-readiness for Texas careers,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “Internships present employers with a unique opportunity to raise students’ understanding of their industry and can serve as a launch point for recruiting a future worker. I challenge Texas employers to join the Texas Internship Challenge and help the future Texas workforce understand the broad range of occupations available to them in the Texas economy.”

“Working with the business community to create more paid internship opportunities is one of the most promising strategies we can offer for students, especially for the more than 60 percent of poor kids in Texas,” said Commissioner of Higher Education Raymund Paredes. “These students have to earn income to make their way through college. Paid internships get them into business networks, help them find a job after college, and help them acquire the marketable skills they need to get those jobs. This supports our 60x30TX marketable skills and student debt goals, and enables Texas employers to promote jobs in their industries to our future workforce.”

“In our meetings across the state employers expressed the need to have a talent pipeline equipped with work-based learning experiences. Internships will prepare students with skills to meet the demands of the 21st century,” said TWC Employer Commissioner Ruth Ruggero Hughs. “I applaud and continue to challenge Texas employers in helping the future Texas workforce understand the broad range of opportunities available to them in a growing Texas economy.”

 

 

San Antonio hospitality jobs added

March 6th, 2018

The newest labor statistics show that San Antonio hospitality jobs have been added.

Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.9 percent in December and remains below the U.S. unemployment rate of 4.1 percent. The Texas economy added 306,900 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs over the year, including 400 jobs added in December. Annual employment growth for Texas was 2.5 percent in December, marking 92 consecutive months of annual growth.

“Texas ended 2017 with record-level job creation numbers during the fourth quarter, with 10 of 11 industries expanding over the year and an annual gain of 306,900 jobs,” said Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) Chairman Andres Alcantar. “TWC looks forward to another year of strong partnerships with innovative Texas employers as they continue to create valuable opportunities for the Texas workforce and contribute to our state’s economic success.”

Industries adding jobs in December included Leisure and Hospitality, which added 6,800 jobs; Construction added 4,300 jobs; and Information, which added 3,600 jobs, and includes traditional and software publishing, data processing and hosting, and telecommunications companies.

“Private sector employers had a successful year in Texas, adding almost 270,000 jobs since December 2016,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “This growth is a great illustration of the value and opportunity that employers bring to the Texas economy.”

The Amarillo and Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.5 percent, followed by the Austin-Round Rock, College Station-Bryan and Lubbock MSAs, which tied for the second lowest with a rate of 2.7 percent. The San Angelo, San Antonio-New Braunfels and Sherman-Denison MSAs also tied for the third lowest rate of 3.0 percent for December.

“The unemployment rate in Texas fell nearly a point over the year 2017, which is great news for workers in the Lone Star State,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “Positive economic growth means continued opportunities for the expanding labor force here in Texas.”

 

Conference highlights San Antonio jobs

March 5th, 2018

A local conference is promising big returns on San Antonio jobs.

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) invites San Antonio–area employers, human resource professionals, business owners and managers to attend the Texas Business Conference employment law update at the Omni San Antonio at The Colonnade in San Antonio.

The conference will provide valuable information for employers and business owners concerning the legal issues associated with operating a business in Texas.

“We are committed to providing employers with the information they need to succeed,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “The Texas Business Conference brings valuable resources to help employers effectively navigate through state and federal employment laws.”

Employers receive practical, up-to-date information for operating a successful business and learn techniques to more effectively manage employees.

Seminar topics include: Texas employment law and the basics of hiring; federal and Texas wage and hour laws; the unemployment claim and appeal process; independent contractors; and employee policy handbooks.

Participants will receive the latest edition of the popular publication, Especially for Texas Employers, which addresses basic legal issues regarding hiring, pay, post-employment and work-separation policies.

The Society for Human Resource Management Texas State Council (Texas SHRM) is co-sponsoring the Texas Business Conferences and offering professional development and Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) recertification credits for human resources professionals attending the conferences. Certificates for the Texas SHRM Professional Development Credits will be handed out to those attending the Texas Business Conference. Also, attorneys may receive up to six hours of Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) credit (no ethics hours) if they attend the entire conference. In addition, certified public accountants who attend can earn six hours of continuing education credit, and other conference participants may qualify for general professional credit.

 

You may not need a degree for some San Antonio jobs

February 7th, 2018

According to a recent Georgetown research survey, there are several great San Antonio jobs that you don’t even need a degree for – among other locations.

State-level analysis of the 30 million good jobs in the economy for those with less than a bachelor’s degree (B.A.) finds that nearly half of states have added good blue-collar jobs that pay without bachelor’s degrees.

Good Jobs That Pay without a B.A.: A State-by-State Analysis finds that 34 states added good non-BA jobs between 1991 and 2015. Texas, Arizona, and states in the South and West experienced the fastest growth in these jobs.

The report also identifies variation among good jobs gains and losses by industry and education across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Manufacturing declined in 38 states and dominated job losses in 14 of the 16 states that lost good jobs overall. Yet, 23 states gained good bluecollar jobs that pay without B.A.s in industries, such as construction and transportation.

Nationally, a gain of 4 million good jobs in skilled-services industries, such as financial services and health services, more than offset the 2.5 million good jobs lost in manufacturing. States in the West and Upper Plains experienced the largest percentage gains in skilled-services good jobs, with especially strong growth in Arizona, Montana, Idaho, and North Dakota. Other states, primarily in the Northeast and Midwest, experienced much slower growth in skilled-service employment than the national average.

Every state experienced a shift in education requirements from high school diplomas or less to some college or associate’s degrees.

Associate’s degree holders in Minnesota increased their share of good jobs the most in the country, expanding by31 percentage points from 1991 to 2015. While high school graduates held more than half of the good jobs for those without B.A.s in 20 states in 1991, by 2015 that was only true in two states: Delaware and West Virginia.

Will employers be hiring for San Antonio jobs?

February 7th, 2018

Some employers may be hiring for San Antonio jobs in the new quarter, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

CareerBuilder’s annual forecast shows that 44 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees in the New Year and half (51 percent) will hire temporary employees.

Forty-five percent of HR managers currently have jobs they cannot fill because they cannot find qualified talent and 58 percent report that they have jobs that stay open for 12 weeks or longer.

The amount of employers planning to hire full-time, permanent staff in the New Year was similar to last year, increasing four percentage points from 40 percent in 2017 to 44 percent in 2018. Six percent of employers expect a decline in staff levels in 2018, an improvement from 8 percent last year. Forty-five percent anticipated no change while 5 percent were unsure.

While employers say functions such as customer service, sales, information technology and production will top their list for full-time, permanent hiring in 2018, they also pointed to other key areas where they will be adding headcount:

  • Jobs tied to skilled labor – 30 percent
  • Jobs tied to data analysis – 25 percent
  • Jobs tied to digital marketing – 17 percent
  • Jobs tied to cybersecurity – 15 percent
  • Jobs tied to automation – 12 percent
  • Jobs tied to artificial intelligence and machine learning – 10 percent

 

Could proposed rule affect healthcare at San Antonio jobs?

February 4th, 2018

A new proposed rule regarding healthcare has been introduced that may affect San Antonio jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to expand the opportunity to offer employment-based health insurance to small businesses through Small Business Health Plans, also known as Association Health Plans.

According to the proposal, up to 11 million Americans working for small businesses/sole proprietors and their families lack employer-sponsored insurance. These 11 million Americans could find coverage under this proposal. Many small employers struggle to offer insurance because it is currently too expensive and cumbersome. These employees – and their families – would have an additional alternative through Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans). These plans would close the gap of uninsured without eliminating options available in the healthcare marketplace.

Under the proposal, small businesses and sole proprietors would have more freedom to band together to provide affordable, quality health insurance for employees.

The proposed rule, which applies only to employer-sponsored health insurance, would allow employers to join together as a single group to purchase insurance in the large group market. These improvements stand to open health insurance coverage for millions of Americans and their families by making it more affordable for thousands of small businesses and sole proprietors. By joining together, employers may reduce administrative costs through economies of scale, strengthen their bargaining position to obtain more favorable deals, enhance their ability to self-insure, and offer a wider array of insurance options.

As proposed, the rule would:

  • Allow employers to form a Small Business Health Plan on the basis of geography or industry. A plan could serve employers in a state, city, county, or a multi-state metro area, or it could serve all the businesses in a particular industry nationwide;
  • Allow sole proprietors to join Small Business Health Plans, clearing a path to access health insurance for the millions of uninsured Americans who are sole proprietors or the family of sole proprietors.

The proposed rule includes important protections for Americans. Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans) cannot charge individuals higher premiums based on health factors or refuse to admit employees to a plan because of health factors. The Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration will closely monitor these plans to protect consumers.

San Antonio education jobs added

January 7th, 2018

A number of San Antonio education jobs have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent, setting a new record for the lowest unemployment rate recorded in four decades. The Texas economy added 54,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs in November. Annual employment growth for Texas increased to 2.7 percent in November, marking 91 consecutive months of annual growth.

 

“The addition of 330,600 jobs over the year demonstrates the consistency with which employers in our state create job opportunities for the highly skilled Texas workforce,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “The Texas economy offers employers access to a competitive workforce and provides job seekers with career options in a variety of growing Texas industries.”

Nine of eleven major industries showed increased growth in November, including Professional and Business Services with 14,700 jobs added and Construction which added 8,200 positions. Leisure and Hospitality employment continued to grow by adding 8,000 jobs in November.

Employment in Education and Health Services increased by 8,200 positions. Over the year, this industry has gained 40,400 jobs. Trade, Transportation, and Utilities employment grew by 8,200 jobs, and Manufacturing industry jobs increased by 2,700 positions.

“Private-sector employers added 52,000 jobs in November and have accounted for the addition of 294,600 positions in Texas over the past year,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “I am encouraged by the growth across a variety of industries and commend our employers for their investment in our Texas workforce.”

The Amarillo and Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.6 percent, followed by the Austin-Round Rock, College Station-Bryan and Lubbock MSAs with a rate of 2.7 percent. The San Antonio-New Braunfels MSA registered a rate of 3.0 percent for November.

“Employment demand continues to be high in well-paying industries such as Manufacturing, Construction, and Mining and Logging,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “I encourage career exploration in these and other industries that are growing in Texas. TWC’s labor market information tools and products are designed to inform, prepare and advance our Texas workforce.”