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Grants given for San Antonio jobs

June 4th, 2019

More grants are being given for San Antonio jobs.

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) has awarded 27 grants totaling $5,718,073 to multiple public community colleges, public technical institutes, public state colleges and independent school districts for programs that focus on supporting high-demand occupations through the Jobs and Education for Texans (JET) grant program.

“I congratulate these JET recipients as they work to enhance educational curriculum and high-demand job training for students in our high schools and community colleges,” said Chair and Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Through innovative partnerships between employers and educators, Texas students will have the advanced skills in the workplace to help meet the demands of the 21stcentury.”

The JET program provides funding for equipment to eligible educational institutions for the purpose of developing career and technical education programs or courses leading to a license, certificate or post-secondary degree. The equipment must be used to train students for jobs in high-demand occupations.

“By giving students the opportunity to train and learn on the same equipment they will use in the field, JET grants ensure that the future workforce of Texas is equipped with the skills necessary to be competitive,” said Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez.

The JET Advisory Board was established to assist TWC in administering these grants. The six-member board meets at least once each quarter, or as needed, to review applications and make recommendations on grant awards.

The Jobs and Education for Texans grant recipients are:

Community, Technical and State Colleges

Angelina County Junior College District – $299,232- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 130 students with training in the occupation of registered nurse.

College of the Mainland – $188,713- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 453 students with training in the occupation of chemical plant and systems operator.

Frank Phillips Junior College – $274,761- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 80 students with training in the occupation of production technician.

Lamar State College-Orange – $184,908- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 168 students with training in the occupation of petroleum pump system operator, refinery operator and gauger.

Lamar State College-Port Arthur – $240,849- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 186 students with training in the occupation of chemical plant and systems operator.

Laredo College – $234,607- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 137 students with training in the occupation of registered nurse.

Lee College – $148,670- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 66 students with training in the occupation of truck driver (heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers).

Northeast Texas Community College – $280,719- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 85 students with training in the occupation of medical assistant.

South Texas College – $75,807- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 575 students with training in the occupation of registered nurse.

Southwest Texas Junior College – $284,917- The grant will help purchase and install equipment to provide 135 students with training in occupation of auto service technician and mechanic.

Opinion letter may affect San Antonio jobs

May 27th, 2019

A new opinion letter may have some bearing on San Antonio jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced that it has issued a new opinion letter that addresses compliance issues related to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). An opinion letter is an official, written opinion by the Department’s Wage and Hour Division (WHD) on how a particular law applies in specific circumstances presented by the individual person or entity that requested the letter.

The opinion letter issued is:

  • FLSA2019-6, addressing whether a service provider for a virtual marketplace company is an employee of the company or an independent contractor under the FLSA.

This letter responds to a request on behalf of a particular virtual marketplace company. It concludes that the workers who provide services to consumers through this specific company’s virtual platform are independent contractors, not employees of the company. To make this determination, WHD applied its longstanding and unchanged six-factor balancing test, derived from Supreme Court precedent:

  • The nature and degree of the potential employer’s control;
  • The permanency of the worker’s relationship with the potential employer;
  • The amount of the worker’s investment in facilities, equipment, or helpers;
  • The amount of skill, initiative, judgment, or foresight required for the worker’s services;
  • The worker’s opportunities for profit or loss; and
  • The extent of integration of the worker’s services into the potential employer’s business.

“An important role of the U.S. Department of Labor is to ensure that employers who want to do the right thing have clear compliance assistance,” said Keith Sonderling, Acting Administrator of the Department’s Wage and Hour Division. “Today, the U.S. Department of Labor offers further insight into the nexus of current labor law and innovations in the job market.”

 

Can scholars program help with San Antonio jobs?

May 27th, 2019

A new project may connect students with important San Antonio jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced a new Job Corps demonstration project to provide at-risk youth with job skills instruction, educational opportunities, and individualized employment counseling through the establishment of the Job Corps Scholars Program.

“The U.S. Department of Labor is committed to helping young individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds receive high-quality vocational and academic instruction opportunities.

This demonstration project will help the Department assess the effectiveness of different approaches to ultimately empower more students to learn relevant skills for in-demand jobs,” said Molly E. Conway, Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Employment and Training.

Under the Job Corps Scholars Program, the Department intends to competitively award up to 20 grants to accredited, two-year, public community colleges; accredited, public two- and four-year historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs); and accredited tribal colleges and universities (TCUs).

The program will use eligible colleges and universities to provide skills instruction and career pathway support to identified and enrolled Job Corps eligible students while giving students the opportunity to earn academic credit hours.

Grantees will use the grant funds to pay for the tuition of the Job Corps Scholars, hire personal and career counselors, and hire employment counselors.

The Job Corps Scholars Program is expected to serve 1,600 students with vocational training over the course of 2 years.

Fair highlights engineering jobs in San Antonio

May 7th, 2019

A recent fair is putting engineering jobs in San Antonio in the spotlight.

Over 1,400 of the brightest students in Texas vied for prizes last weekend at the Texas Science and Engineering Fair, a competition that brings together top science and engineering fair winners from across the state. The event was hosted by Texas A&M University at the Ford Hall of Champions and the All-American Club in Kyle Field. The occasion began with a Night at the ZACH! on Friday and culminated with an awards presentation on Saturday, March 30, at the Gilliam Indoor Track Stadium. The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) has co-sponsored the competition for 18 consecutive years with ExxonMobil.

In the senior division, Ashna and Ashay Shah from Plano East Senior High School in Plano received the grand prize for physical sciences and Jack Delli-Santi from Lake Travis High School in Austin received the grand prize for life sciences. While in the junior division, Otto Beall from Otto Middle School in Plano received the grand prize in physical sciences and Ganesh Venu from Friendswood Junior High School in Friendswood received the grand prize for life sciences.

“The 2019 Texas Science and Engineering Fair once again showcased the wonderful creativity and invention of our students,” said TWCChair Ruth R. Hughs. “The critical STEM skills the participants are developing will help build the future of Texas’ economic development. I applaud the innovation, dedication and hard work displayed by all of the participants and congratulate the division winners who will participate in the annual Governor’s Science and Technology Champions Academy this summer at Southern Methodist University.”

Students competed in two divisions—junior (grades six through eight) and senior (grades nine through twelve)—in one of 22 categories. Nine seniors were awarded Best of Fair honors and will advance to the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair this May in Phoenix, Arizona. In addition to the Grand Prize and Best of Fair winners, awards were presented to first- through third-place honorees in each category.

First and second place winners from the fair’s senior division were awarded a scholarship to attend the Texas Governor’s Science and Technology Champions Academy, a week-long residential summer camp, also sponsored by TWC, which will be held this summer at Southern Methodist University.

Construction jobs in San Antonio climb

May 7th, 2019

More construction jobs in San Antonio have been added, according to labor results.

Growth in the Texas economy continued in March, with 22,600 seasonally adjusted nonfarm positions added over the month. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remains unchanged at 3.8 percent. March marked the 107th consecutive month of annual growth for total nonfarm employment. March also marks a historic moment for the Texas economy as the Civilian Labor Force reached a record high of over 14- million.

“Texas’ economic miracle is a testament to the unmatched innovation of our Texas employers and their dedication to creating jobs and investing in communities across the state,” said TWC Chair Ruth Ruggero Hughs.  “The Texas economy offers employers access to a competitive workforce and provides job seekers with career options in a variety of growing Texas industries.”

Private sector employers added 262,300 jobs over the year. Private annual employment growth was at 2.5 percent in March and has held above 2.0 percent since October 2017.

Leisure and Hospitality added 8,600 jobs over the month, the most among major industries in Texas. This major industry has seen 104 consecutive months of over-the-year growth since August 2010.

“Our labor force is thriving, in fact, this month reached 14 million, the highest estimate since 1976. Through a dedication to skills training and a focus on career options, Texas’ labor force remains one of the strongest in the nation,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “TWC is continually committed to developing innovative workforce programs and supporting Texas businesses with a skilled talent pipeline that is unmatched throughout the nation.”

Construction industry employment grew over the month by 5,100 jobs in March while the annual growth rate moved up four-tenths of a percentage point to 3.9 percent. The Education and Health Services industry also increased over the month with 6,500 jobs added.

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) recorded March’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.1 percent, followed by the Odessa MSA which recorded at 2.5 for the second lowest rate. The Amarillo, Austin-Round Rock and College Station-Bryan MSAs tied for the third lowest rate of 2.7 percent.

“Year after year Texas ranks among the best places to work in the nation, not only because our economy continues to grow as companies covet our skilled workers but because of continuous investment in our economy,” said TWC Commissioner Representing the Public Robert Thomas. “Today’s news shows that our strong Texas economy is creating new and larger opportunities for millions of workers all across our great state.”

San Antonio hospitality jobs added

May 7th, 2019

A number of San Antonio hospitality jobs have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Growth in the Texas economy continued in March, with 22,600 seasonally adjusted nonfarm positions added over the month. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remains unchanged at 3.8 percent.

March marked the 107th consecutive month of annual growth for total nonfarm employment. March also marks a historic moment for the Texas economy as the Civilian Labor Force reached a record high of over 14- million.

“Texas’ economic miracle is a testament to the unmatched innovation of our Texas employers and their dedication to creating jobs and investing in communities across the state,” said TWC Chair Ruth Ruggero Hughs.  “The Texas economy offers employers access to a competitive workforce and provides job seekers with career options in a variety of growing Texas industries.”

Private sector employers added 262,300 jobs over the year. Private annual employment growth was at 2.5 percent in March and has held above 2.0 percent since October 2017.

Leisure and Hospitality added 8,600 jobs over the month, the most among major industries in Texas. This major industry has seen 104 consecutive months of over-the-year growth since August 2010.

“Our labor force is thriving, in fact, this month reached 14 million, the highest estimate since 1976. Through a dedication to skills training and a focus on career options, Texas’ labor force remains one of the strongest in the nation,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “TWC is continually committed to developing innovative workforce programs and supporting Texas businesses with a skilled talent pipeline that is unmatched throughout the nation.”

Construction industry employment grew over the month by 5,100 jobs in March while the annual growth rate moved up four-tenths of a percentage point to 3.9 percent. The Education and Health Services industry also increased over the month with 6,500 jobs added.

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) recorded March’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.1 percent, followed by the Odessa MSA which recorded at 2.5 for the second lowest rate. The Amarillo, Austin-Round Rock and College Station-Bryan MSAs tied for the third lowest rate of 2.7 percent.

Trade jobs in San Antonio grow

April 4th, 2019

The number of trade jobs in San Antonio are climbing, according to recent labor statistics.

The Texas economy saw more positive employment growth to begin 2019, with 15,400 seasonally adjusted nonfarm positions added in January. After holding at a historic low for five consecutive months, Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate rose slightly to 3.8 percent. January marked the 105th consecutive month of annual growth for total nonfarm employment.

“Texas employers added 292,000 jobs since last January, an increase of 2.4 percent, which provides exceptional opportunities for our highly skilled workforce and highlights the competitive strength of our diverse economy,” said TWC Chair and Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Texas is state that continues to welcome new employers and was recently awarded the Governor’s Cup for our efforts in economic development for a record- breaking seventh year in a row.”

Private sector annual employment growth held steady at 2.6 percent in January and has held above 2.0 percent since October 2017.

The Professional and Business Services industry led over the month with a gain of 8,800 jobs. This industry also gained the second most jobs over the year with 47,800 positions, for a 2.8 percent annual growth rate.  Included in this industry, the Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services sector contributed most of the job gains over the year with 33,000 positions.

“Positive economic growth means continued opportunities for the expanding labor force here in Texas in well-paying industries such as Healthcare, Manufacturing, and Construction,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “The Texas labor force has much to offer and there are resources available to find the perfect occupational fit. I encourage our labor force to connect with TWC’s apprenticeship training program that can help prepare them for a well-paying career.”

Trade, Transportation, and Utilities added 51,000 jobs from January 2018 to January 2019 – more positions than any other major industry in Texas. The Wholesale Trade and Transportation, Warehousing, and Utilities sectors contributed over 90 percent of this growth.

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) recorded January’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.3 percent, followed by the Odessa MSA which recorded at 2.8 for the second lowest rate.  The Amarillo MSA recorded the third lowest rate of 3.1 percent.

“Much like the tenacity of Texans, job creation is strong in our state,” said TWC Commissioner Representing the Public Robert D. Thomas. “Through continued hard work, and policies focused on empowering our most at-risk residents, Texas’ economy can not only endure but serve as an example of prosperity.”

Hospitality jobs in San Antonio grow

April 4th, 2019

The number of hospitality jobs in San Antonio have grown, according to recent labor statistics.

Growth in the Texas economy continued in February, with 17,700 seasonally adjusted nonfarm positions added over the month. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate held at 3.8 percent. February marked the 106th consecutive month of annual growth for total nonfarm employment.

“Adding 15,100 jobs in February, Texas’ private-sector employers continue to drive our economy and our state’s robust and competitive growth,” said TWC Chair and Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R Hughs. “Texas is an exceptional state for industry and business leaders to attract and retain highly-skilled workers. TWC is committed to engaging with all employers across Texas to strengthen our economy and to create and expand opportunities for all.”

Private sector employers added 256,000 jobs over the year. Private annual employment growth was at 2.5 percent in February and has held above 2.0 percent since October 2017.

Leisure and Hospitality added 5,500 jobs over the month, the most among major industries in Texas. This major industry has seen 103 consecutive months of over-the-year growth since August 2010.

“With each passing month, Texas continues a growth trajectory resulting in high-paying jobs in essential industries like manufacturing, professional services, and financial activities,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “To ensure positive growth, we must continue to invest in necessary training and education for subsequent generations. Through events like Texas Career and Technical Education (CTE) signing day, students are equipped with the training required for in demand occupations and that our workforce has the skills needed to remain competitive.”

Professional and Business Services grew by 4,100 jobs in February, driven mostly by growth in Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services, and Administrative, Support, and Waste Management and Remediation Services. The industry’s growth rate has held at or above 2.0 percent since May 2017. After being revised up for a 3,600-position increase in January, Financial Activities added another 3,800 jobs in February, driven by increases in Finance and Insurance.

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) recorded February’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.2 percent, followed by the Odessa MSA which recorded at 2.7 for the second lowest rate. The Amarillo MSA recorded the third lowest rate of 2.9 percent.

 

Summer programs to connect students with San Antonio jobs

April 4th, 2019

A summer program is connecting students with San Antonio jobs.

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) announced the kickoff of its 2019 Summer Earn and Learn program that provides students with disabilities, aged 14-22, work readiness training and paid work experience. The program is a partnership between TWCLocal Workforce Development Boards and Texas Workforce Solutions-Vocational Rehabilitation Services (TWS-VRS).

“The Summer Earn and Learn program provides employers with direct access to their local workforce, which includes students with disabilities who are eager to learn and work,” said TWC Chair and Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Employers who are committed to the professional development of workers in their industries and developing potentially long-term employees will find value in this program.”

Last year, more than 2,400 students participated in the Summer Earn and Learn program where they connected with employers who included Baylor Scott & White Health in Temple, KLBK TV in Lubbock and the Fort Worth Botanic Garden. Throughout the program, students learned about the employers’ industries and developed specialized skills and work experience. Upon completion of the program, some students were presented with the opportunity to become employed full time.

Local Workforce Development Boards, who oversee the Workforce Solutions Offices, will collaborate with local TWS-VRS staff to promote the program and identify students and businesses who are interested in participating. Students will receive work readiness training and connect with local employers where they will have the opportunity to do hands-on work for five weeks or more. The students will learn about the employer’s industry and develop skills and work experience that will prepare them for successful transitions to postsecondary education and employment.

“Access to opportunities is often the difference between financial stability and hardships for many Texans living with disabilities,” said TWCCommissioner Representing the Public Robert Thomas “I am proud to support the Summer Earn and Learn program as it provides a path for students and young adults with disabilities to gain valuable experience so that they can enjoy life-long careers as part of the robust Texas workforce.”

Are data analysis jobs in San Antonio climbing?

March 26th, 2019

The number of data analysis jobs in San Antonio may be increasing, according to a recent study from Careerbuilder on job seeker trends.

Recruiting Trends to Watch for 2019

  • The job seeker experience is paramount: HR managers (36 percent) cite improved user experiences for candidates, employees, and hiring managers as a top priority for recruitment and HR management going into 2019.
  • Efficiency is critical: HR managers also say helping recruiters to be more efficient in filling roles faster with higher quality candidates (29 percent) and expediting background checks (24 percent) are seen as top priorities for recruitment and HR management going into 2019.
  • Streamlined communication: Twenty-two percent of HR managers believe technology will be most beneficial in helping manage and maintain regular communication with job candidates during the application process. To simplify the process, CareerBuilder’s new TD Companion App enables hiring managers to communicate directly with candidates through text message and email.
  • Speak the same language: Recruiters speak one language and candidates speak another; it’s no wonder 39 percent of HR managers say technology would be most beneficial in helping with sorting through applicants to identify top candidates and remove candidates that are not qualified. CareerBuilder has crossed the language barrier with the use of AI and semantic search to halve the applicant to hire ratio.
  • Perfecting the process: Bad hires can negatively affect companies, and the main ways they impacted employers’ businesses last year were less productivity (28 percent), they negatively impacted employee morale (25 percent), and they drove up costs for recruiting and training other workers (24 percent). Additionally, employers who have had a bad hire affect their business in the past year estimate the average cost of a bad hire is more than $18,700.

Top Areas for Hiring in 2019

As new technologies are constantly introduced, legacy industries are being transformed and the need for workers with specialized, high-tech capabilities is on the rise.

  • In Demand Areas for Hiring
    • Jobs tied to skilled labor: 25 percent
    • Jobs tied to data analysis: 21 percent
    • Jobs tied to digital marketing: 12 percent
    • Jobs tied to cyber security: 11 percent
    • Jobs tied to AI and machine learning: 10 percent
    • Jobs tied to healthy living: 10 percent
  • Hiring by Region: Where Employers Are Hiring Full-Time, Permanent Employees
    • West: 44 percent
    • South: 42 percent
    • Northeast: 37 percent
    • Midwest: 35 percent