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Training grants go to San Antonio jobs

June 6th, 2016

A round of grants are going to help veterans secure San Antonio jobs, among other locations.

The award of $36 million in Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program grants will help an estimated 17,000 veterans successfully transition to sustainable housing and good civilian jobs. The grants will fund a variety of services to assist homeless veterans in their return to the labor force including occupational, classroom and on-the-job training, as well as job search and placement assistance.

“Veterans homelessness is a moral outrage and it hurts the economy as well,” said the secretary in announcing the grants at the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans‘ annual conference today. “We know that America works best when we field a full team, and veterans are some of our most valuable players. When a lack of stable housing is keeping highly skilled veterans out of the workforce, we all lose out on their gifts and talents.”

Grants were awarded on a competitive basis to state and local workforce investment boards, local public agencies and nonprofit organizations, tribal governments, and faith-based and community organizations. HVRP is the only federal program focused exclusively on employment of homeless veterans. President Obama has proposed increasing funding for the HVRP program to $50 million in the Fiscal Year 2017 Budget.

Many HVRP grant recipients’ awards will also include funding to allow them to target specific at-risk veteran populations. The Incarcerated Veterans Transition Program provides funding for services to expedite the reintegration of incarcerated or recently incarcerated veterans who are at risk for homeless into the labor force. The Homeless Female Veterans and Veterans with Families Program provides funding for services to expedite the reintegration of homeless female veterans and veterans with families into the labor force.

Grantees in the HVRP program network coordinate their efforts with various local, state and federal social service providers.

Healthcare jobs in San Antonio burgeon

June 6th, 2016

The number of healthcare jobs in San Antonio has grown, according to recent labor statistics.

The unemployment rate declined by 0.3 percentage point to 4.7 percent in May, and nonfarm payroll employment changed little (+38,000), the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported.

Health care added 46,000 jobs in May, with increases occurring in ambulatory health care services (+24,000), hospitals (+17,000), and nursing care facilities (+5,000).

Over the year, health care employment has increased by 487,000. In May, mining employment continued to decline (-10,000).

Since reaching a peak in September 2014, mining has lost 207,000 jobs. Support activities for mining accounted for three-fourths of the jobs lost during this period, including 6,000 in May.

Employment in information declined by 34,000 in May. About 35,000 workers in the telecommunications industry were on strike and not on company payrolls during the survey reference period. Within manufacturing, employment in durable goods declined by 18,000 in May, with job losses of 7,000 in machinery and 3,000 in furniture and related products.

Employment in professional and business services changed little in May (+10,000), after increasing by 55,000 in April. Within the industry, professional and technical services added 26,000 jobs in May, in line with average monthly gains over the prior 12 months.

Employment in temporary help services was little changed over the month (-21,000) but is down by 64,000 thus far this year.

Employment in other major industries, including construction, wholesale trade, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government, changed little over the month.

 

New legislation and San Antonio jobs

May 31st, 2016

A new rule about overtime pay is changing the way we look at San Antonio jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) finalized sweeping changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) overtime rules extending protections to 4.2 million U.S. workers.

The changes double the salary threshold for “white collar” exemptions from the current minimum of $455 per week, or $23,660 a year, to $913 per week, or $47,476 annually. The updated rules also increase the minimum salary of highly compensated employees from $100,000 per year to $134,004 per year and establish a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels for exempt employees every three years.

The final rules, which will take effect on December 1, 2016, also allow employers to use nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments to satisfy up to 10 percent of the new standard salary level. They do not make any changes to the duties test for executive, administrative and professional employees.

Here are a few steps businesses should take now to further their compliance efforts:

1) Take Stock and Review Classifications. Employers should first ensure that they thoroughly understand their current employees’ compensation structure, classifications and the rules around the FLSA exempt versus nonexempt status. Any exempt employee who earns greater than the threshold amount ($47,476 under the new rules) may remain exempt from overtime pay if that person primarily performs executive, administrative or professional duties as described in the regulations. Those making less than the threshold should be carefully considered for reclassification. Also note that each state may enact regulations that differ from federal regulations. Businesses will be subject to whichever set of directives is more generous to employees.

2) Closely Manage and Monitor Employee Hours. To better understand the overtime being worked, monitor employee hours and use appropriate tools to help make educated scheduling decisions. One effective method is to implement an automated time and labor management system that continuously tracks hours worked, helps companies monitor when an employee nears the overtime threshold, and makes it easier to create more cost-effective schedules.

3) Compare the Costs of Pay Options. Weigh the costs of raising employees’ salaries to meet the exemption criteria against what it would cost to reclassify them as non-exempt and pay them overtime when they work more than 40 hours per week.

4) Consider the Impact on Internal Pay Equity. Beyond the costs of raising exempt employees’ salaries, consider the impact on internal pay equity. Internal equity means employees are paid fairly when compared with other employees within your company. If you substantially increase some employees’ pay, other employees may have questions about why their pay isn’t increasing.

 

Are San Antonio jobs cuts climbing?

May 8th, 2016

San Antonio job cuts may be increasing, according to a recent release from Challenger, Gray, & Christmas.

The pace of downsizing increased in April, as US-based employers announced workforce reductions totaling 65,141 during the month, according to the latest report released Thursday from global outplacement consultancy Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc.

The April figure represents a 35 percent increase over March, when employers announced 48,207 planned layoffs. Last month’s job cuts were 5.8 percent higher than the 61,582 recorded in April 2015.

Employers have announced a total of 250,061 planned job cuts through the first four months of 2016. That is up 24 percent from the 201,796 job cuts tracked during the same period a year ago. It is the highest January-April total since 2009, when the opening four months of the year saw 695,100 job cuts.

“We continue to see large scale layoffs in the energy sector, where low oil prices are driving down profits. However, we are also seeing heavy downsizing activity in other areas, such as computers and retail, where changing consumer trends are creating a lot of volatility,” said John A. Challenger, chief executive officer of Challenger, Gray & Christmas.

The energy sector announced another 19,759 job cuts in April, bringing the year-to-date total to 72,660. That is up 26 percent from the 57,556 energy-sector job cuts announced in the first four months of 2015.

Computer firms announced 16,923 job cuts during the month; the highest total among all industries. That total includes 12,000 from chipmaker Intel, which is shifting away from the traditional desktop and laptop market and toward the mobile market.

To date, computer firms have announced 33,925 job cuts, up 262 percent from a year ago, when job cuts in the sector totaled just 9,368 through the first four months of the year.

“For all intents and purposes, the economy remains strong. The nation’s payrolls have experienced 66 consecutive months of net job gains, a trend that is likely to continue with the new report out Friday. The unemployment rate is at five percent, with a growing number of metropolitan areas at three percent or lower. Yet, job cuts are trending upward,” noted Challenger.

The ideal candidate for San Antonio jobs

May 3rd, 2016

Monster.com has just released a small business survey describing the ideal candidate for San Antonio jobs, among other locations.

While many of today’s small business owners continue to devote more of their own time and effort to finding the ideal candidate, some are actually not improving their search whatsoever. Of those who have hired the wrong person before, 56 percent are investing more time to make sure they don’t do this again, but only about one in five aren’t doing anything at all (18 percent).

Although nine in ten (89 percent) small business owners find the hiring process time consuming and three-fifths (61 percent) wish they had more help in finding the right person for the job, significantly fewer owners are currently hiring an outside service to help recruit (11 percent). Monster’s goal is to make small business owners aware that these resources and solutions exist, all within their budget.

“Monster has been able to reach the type of person we want, in the way they’re searching for jobs, be it a smart phone, social sites,” said Brian Bailey, co-founder of Old Carolina Barbecue company, another of Monster’s small business customers.

In addition to being a financial burden, hiring the wrong person can have an emotional effect on small business owners. About three in four owners who have hired the wrong person before feel frustrated (73 percent), stressed (47 percent) and discouraged (36 percent) as a result. The survey also found that:

  • Over half of those who have hired the wrong person before have experienced a loss of time (69 percent) and money (56 percent) due to wrong hires.
  • Specifically, one-third or more of these owners estimate wasting over 50 hours of their time (34 percent) and over $1,000 (42 percent) due to their most recent wrong hire.
  • Other issues caused by hiring the wrong person include product errors (51 percent) and loss of customers (24 percent).

Students focus on engineering jobs in San Antonio

May 2nd, 2016

A new study shows that engineering jobs in San Antonio are ideal for students looking for a good major.

According to a new survey from CareerBuilder, 67 percent of employers say they plan to hire recent college graduates this year, up from 65 percent last year and the highest outlook since 2007. More than a third (37 percent) plan to offer recent college graduates higher pay than last year, and 27 percent of employers hiring recent college graduates this year will pay a starting salary of $50,000 or more.

While prospects appear better, some employers are concerned that new college grads may not be ready for the real world. Twenty-four percent do not feel academic institutions are adequately preparing students for roles needed within their organizations, an increase from 21 percent last year.

When asked where academic institutions fall short, these employers cited the following concerns:

  • Too much emphasis on book learning instead of real-world learning: 47 percent
  • I need workers with a blend of technical skills and those skills gained from liberal arts: 39 percent
  • Entry-level roles within my organization are more complex today: 25 percent
  • Not enough focus on internships: 13 percent
  • Technology is changing too quickly for an academic environment to keep up: 13 percent
  • Not enough students are graduating with the degrees my company needs: 11 percent

When asked to name which skills they think recent college graduates lack for the workplace, most of these employers cited interpersonal or people (52 percent) or problem-solving skills (48 percent). Other skills these employers stated include:

  • Leadership: 42 percent
  • Teamwork: 39 percent
  • Written communication: 37 percent
  • Oral communication: 37 percent
  • Creative thinking: 35 percent
  • Project management: 27 percent
  • Research and analysis: 17 percent
  • Math: 15 percent
  • Computer and technical: 14 percent

Employers add San Antonio healthcare jobs

April 6th, 2016

More employers are looking to add more San Antonio healthcare jobs in the second quarter, according to a Careerbuilder survey.

One third of employers (34 percent) plan to add full-time, permanent employees over the next three months and 37 percent plan to hire temporary or contract workers.

Hiring in the first three months of 2016 outperformed the same period in 2015. Thirty-seven percent of employers hired full-time, permanent employees, up from 35 percent last year. The percentage of employers who decreased headcount (9 percent) is on par with last year. Fifty-three percent reported no change in their headcount while 1 percent said their company is undecided.

Looking ahead, 34 percent of employers plan to add full-time, permanent staff in the second quarter, up from 32 percent last year. Seven percent expect to decrease staff, down slightly from 8 percent last year. Fifty-five percent anticipate no change while 5 percent are undecided.

Industries expected to match or exceed the national average for adding full-time, permanent headcount in the second quarter are:

  • Health Care (50 or more employees) – 44 percent
  • Financial Services – 42 percent
  • Leisure & Hospitality – 41 percent
  • Information Technology – 40 percent

While large organizations are adding staff at a faster rate, the increased confidence small- and medium-sized businesses have displayed in previous quarters is expected to carry over into Q2:

  • 50 or fewer employees – 24 percent plan to increase the number of full-time, permanent staff in Q2, up from 23 percent last year; those reducing headcount remained at 4 percent
  • 250 or fewer employees – 29 percent plan to increase the number of full-time, permanent staff in Q2, up from 27 percent last year; those reducing headcount remained at 6 percent
  • More than 500 employees – 41 percent plan to increase the number of full-time, permanent staff in Q2, up from 38 percent last year; those reducing headcount decreased from 9 percent last year to 8 percent

 

San Antonio construction jobs added

April 3rd, 2016

Many more San Antonio construction jobs have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Private sector employment increased by 200,000 jobs from February to March according to the March ADP National Employment Report.

Payrolls for businesses with 49 or fewer employees increased by 86,000 jobs in March, up from February’s downwardly revised 68,000. Employment at companies with 50-499 employees increased by 75,000 jobs, up from February’s 60,000. Employment at large companies — those with 500 or more employees — dropped off to 39,000 which is about half of February’s 77,000. Companies with 500-999 employees added 20,000 jobs, up from 14,000 in February. Companies with over 1,000 employees fell from 63,000 jobs added in February to 18,000 this month.

Goods-producing employment rose by 9,000 jobs in March, up from a downwardly revised 2,000 in February. The construction industry added 17,000 jobs, which was down from February’s 24,000. Meanwhile, manufacturing added 3,000 jobs after losing 9,000 the previous month.

Service-providing employment rose by 191,000 jobs in March, down from 204,000 in February. The ADP National Employment Report indicates that professional/business services contributed 28,000 jobs, down sharply from February’s 51,000. Trade/transportation/utilities grew by 42,000, well above the 24,000 jobs added the previous month. Financial activities added 14,000 jobs which is in line with the average monthly increase in that sector over the past year.

“The Trade, Transportation and Utilities sector had its best month of employment gains since last June,” said Ahu Yildirmaz, VP and head of theADP Research Institute. “Steady employment growth and accelerating wage growth in the workforce appear to be benefitting the Trade segment in particular.”

  • By Sector
    • Goods-producing 9,000
    • Service-providing 191,000
  • Industry Snapshot
    • Construction 17,000
    • Manufacturing 3,000
    • Trade/transportation/utilities 42,000
    • Financial activities 14,000
    • Professional/business services 28,000

March Madness at San Antonio jobs

March 28th, 2016

Managers are more likely to play in March Madness tournaments at San Antonio jobs than other employees, according to a recent Careerbuilder survey.

Executives, directors and managers (senior management, VPs, directors/managers/supervisors/team leaders) are far more likely to participate in office pools than professional staff and technical employees (professional/technical staff member, entry level/administrative/clerical) – 27 percent vs. 19 percent.

About one in eight U.S. workers (12 percent) said they plan to participate in the March Madness office pool this year; that’s down from the 15 percent who planned to do so in 2015. Twenty percent of U.S workers said they’ve participated in an NCAA Tournament office pool in the past.

Are these kinds of behaviors allowed in the office? More than half of employees (56 percent) do not know whether their company has official policies on gambling in the office.

The following represent the groups of workers most likely to have participated in the March Madness NCAA Basketball Tournament office pool in the past.

Industry: 
Workers in financial services and sales lead all industries/professions in office pool participation.

  • Financial services: 35 percent
  • Sales: 33 percent
  • IT: 26 percent
  • Transportation: 26 percent
  • Manufacturing: 23 percent
  • Leisure and hospitality: 18 percent
  • Health care: 15 percent
  • Retail: 15 percent

Construction jobs in San Antonio grow

March 10th, 2016

Construction jobs in San Antonio are climbing, according to the latest employment data from ADP.

Private sector employment increased by 214,000 jobs from January to February according to the February ADP National Employment Report.

Payrolls for businesses with 49 or fewer employees increased by 76,000 jobs in February, in line with January’s downwardly revised 75,000.

Employment among companies with 50-499 employees increased by 62,000 jobs, down from January’s downwardly revised 74,000.

Employment at large companies – those with 500 or more employees – came in at 76,000, a big jump from January’s 44,000. Companies with 500-999 added 14,000 jobs, while companies with over 1,000 employees gained 62,000 jobs.

Goods-producing employment rose by 5,000 jobs in February, just over a quarter of January’s upwardly revised 19,000.

The construction industry added 27,000 jobs, which was slightly above January’s upwardly revised 26,000.

Meanwhile, manufacturing lost 9,000 jobs, the second largest drop in five years. Service-providing employment rose by 208,000 jobs in February, up from a downwardly revised 174,000 in January.

The ADP National Employment Report indicates that professional/business services contributed 59,000 jobs, up sharply from January’s downwardly revised 38,000.

Trade/transportation/utilities grew by 20,000, down from a downwardly revised 26,000 the previous month. The 8,000 new jobs added in financial activities were the least in that sector since August 2015.

“Large businesses showed surprisingly strong job gains in February, despite the continuation of economic trends that negatively impact big companies like turmoil in international markets and a strengthening dollar,” said Ahu Yildirmaz, VP and head of the ADP Research Institute. “The gains were mostly driven by the service sector which accounted for almost all the jobs added by large businesses.” Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody’s Analytics, said.