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Archive for July, 2014

Grants to boost those seeking San Antonio jobs

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

A slew of grants from the Dept. of Labor has been given to many states, including those seeking San Antonio jobs, to train workers who lost a job through no fault of their own for jobs in high-demand industries.

The grants total $154,757,547 and were awarded to 32 states, Puerto Rico and the Cherokee tribal nation through the Job-Driven National Emergency Grant program.

The grants will help create or expand employer partnerships that provide opportunities for on-the-job training, Registered Apprenticeships or other occupational training that result in an industry-recognized credential. Funding will also be used to provide services, such as career coaching and counseling, as well as assisting with job placement that help connect laid-off workers, including the long-term unemployed, with available jobs.

“At the President’s request, I’ve been leading an effort to help Americans get the skills they need to secure good quality jobs that are a path to the middle class,” Vice President Biden said. “The grants announced today will help build partnerships between industry, labor and communities to help more Americans learn about job openings, identify what skills are needed to fill them, and train and apply for the good-paying jobs that are out there in health care, information technology, advanced manufacturing and other high-growth industries.”

“President Obama has made it a priority to expand opportunities for people to access in-demand skills training. That’s why, at the Department of Labor, we are investing in proven strategies that connect ready-to-work Americans with ready-to-be-filled jobs. This year, we will release roughly $1 billion in targeted, job-driven training funds,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. “Providing workers with access to the skills training they need to pursue in-demand jobs is critical to expanding opportunity and to helping businesses grow and thrive. We know that job-driven training programs work, and that they’re often the best way to provide real ladders of opportunity. Today’s awards will help states establish or expand programs that can change peoples’ lives.”

“Since taking office about one year ago, I have spoken to more than 1,000 CEOs and business leaders around the country. Across the board, they have told me that finding the right workers to fill available jobs is a top challenge they are facing, and that is one reason the Department of Commerce has made skills and workforce development a top priority for the very first time,” said U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker. “From my personal experience, I know this: businesses have to be at the table as we develop training mechanisms to define precisely what they are looking for as they hire employees. These investments will assist in the creation of new or expanded employer partnerships that will help us break down silos between businesses, workforce training initiatives and government to create a collaborative environment that supports the needs of both our workers and our businesses.”

n addition to expanding work-based learning strategies — which recent studies show increase employment and earnings outcomes — grantees are also expected to develop strong partnerships between workforce and industry organizations and align services with other federal, state or local programs and agencies, such as Unemployment Insurance, Trade Adjustment Assistance, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and economic development agencies.

Workers with San Antonio jobs would keep working if they won lottery

Monday, July 21st, 2014

Some workers with San Antonio jobs would remain in their position even if they hit the lottery, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

Half (51 percent) of workers reported that, even if they didn’t need a job financially, they would still work after winning the lottery. Thirty percent of all workers say they would keep their current job.

The most common reasons workers would stay employed after winning the lottery included:

I would be bored if I didn’t work – 77 percent
Work gives me a sense of purpose and accomplishment – 76 percent
I want financial security aside from the financial winnings – 42 percent
I would miss co-workers – 23 percent

Nearly half (49 percent) say they’d take the opportunity to leave the workforce. When asked how they would quit their jobs, the most common responses included:

Give two weeks’ notice or give my employer more time if they needed it to find a replacement – 48 percent
Give two weeks’ notice and leave after two weeks – 31 percent
Resign that day without giving notice – 13 percent
Tell off the boss and air all grievances – 3 percent
Not show up to work the next morning without formally quitting – 2 percent.

Only 15 percent of workers report they are currently working in their dream job, and another 36 percent say that while they’re not quite there yet, they believe they will be someday.

Funding helps youth with disabilities get San Antonio jobs

Monday, July 7th, 2014

A round of funding coming from the Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy to improve post-secondary education and employment opportunities for youth with disabilities through the Pathways to Careers: Community Colleges for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities Demonstration Project, which could serve those who aim to get San Antonio jobs, among other locations.

Each cooperative agreement may receive up to $1,041,650 to fund a pilot project that will build the capacity of community colleges to meet the educational and career development needs of youth with disabilities, including those with significant disabilities.

The pilots will provide for researching, developing, testing and evaluating innovative systems to deliver inclusive integrated education and career development services.

To be eligible, grant applicants must be: institutes of higher education that provide education and career training that can be completed in two years or less and recipients of funding through the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program.

Grantees will be required to use the Guideposts for Success, developed by ODEP in collaboration with the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, as a framework in developing their projects.

They must also establish partnerships with public workforce systems; intermediary organizations serving as conveners, brokers or technical assistance providers; philanthropic, business-related, nonprofit, community-based or labor organizations; youth-focused disability-serving organizations; state or local disability-serving organizations; and local education agencies.

The grant-funded programs must serve youth and young adults with disabilities between the ages of 14 and 24. This award will cover a 60-month period of performance and will fund the first 12-month budget period. ODEP, at its discretion, may make available continuation awards for additional 12-month budget periods through the end of the period of performance.

“Our nation’s community colleges are a tremendous resource for anyone seeking to position themselves for high-growth, high-demand careers, and they can be an especially critical link for youth with disabilities,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy Kathy Martinez. “This federal funding will ensure that these young people have opportunities to develop top-notch skills as they transition from school to the world of work.”