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Archive for January, 2018

San Antonio education jobs added

Sunday, January 7th, 2018

A number of San Antonio education jobs have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent, setting a new record for the lowest unemployment rate recorded in four decades. The Texas economy added 54,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs in November. Annual employment growth for Texas increased to 2.7 percent in November, marking 91 consecutive months of annual growth.


“The addition of 330,600 jobs over the year demonstrates the consistency with which employers in our state create job opportunities for the highly skilled Texas workforce,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “The Texas economy offers employers access to a competitive workforce and provides job seekers with career options in a variety of growing Texas industries.”

Nine of eleven major industries showed increased growth in November, including Professional and Business Services with 14,700 jobs added and Construction which added 8,200 positions. Leisure and Hospitality employment continued to grow by adding 8,000 jobs in November.

Employment in Education and Health Services increased by 8,200 positions. Over the year, this industry has gained 40,400 jobs. Trade, Transportation, and Utilities employment grew by 8,200 jobs, and Manufacturing industry jobs increased by 2,700 positions.

“Private-sector employers added 52,000 jobs in November and have accounted for the addition of 294,600 positions in Texas over the past year,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “I am encouraged by the growth across a variety of industries and commend our employers for their investment in our Texas workforce.”

The Amarillo and Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.6 percent, followed by the Austin-Round Rock, College Station-Bryan and Lubbock MSAs with a rate of 2.7 percent. The San Antonio-New Braunfels MSA registered a rate of 3.0 percent for November.

“Employment demand continues to be high in well-paying industries such as Manufacturing, Construction, and Mining and Logging,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “I encourage career exploration in these and other industries that are growing in Texas. TWC’s labor market information tools and products are designed to inform, prepare and advance our Texas workforce.”


Conferences spotlight San Antonio human resource jobs

Sunday, January 7th, 2018

A number of conferences that will be in new in 2018 are spotlighting San Antonio jobs, among other locations.

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) has announced its 2018 Texas Business Conference schedule with 16 locations available throughout the state.

The conferences offer employers and human resource professionals the opportunity to earn education credits, learn about new employment laws, network with peers, and talk one-on-one with employment attorneys.

TWC invites area employers, human resource professionals, business owners and managers to attend the conferences, which will provide valuable information for employers and business owners concerning the legal issues associated with operating a business in Texas.

“We are committed to providing employers with the information they need to succeed,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Our new season of Texas Business Conferences brings valuable resources to help employers effectively navigate through state and federal employment laws.”

Employers receive practical, up-to-date information for operating a successful business and learn techniques to more effectively manage employees.

Seminar topics include: Texas employment law and the basics of hiring; federal and Texas wage and hour laws; the unemployment claim and appeal process; independent contractors; and employee policy handbooks. Participants will receive the latest edition of the popular publication, Especially for Texas Employers, which addresses basic legal issues regarding hiring, pay, post-employment and work-separation policies.

The Society for Human Resource Management Texas State Council (Texas SHRM) is co-sponsoring the Texas Business Conferences and offering professional development and Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) recertification credits for human resources professionals attending the conferences.

Certificates for the Texas SHRM Professional Development Credits will be handed out to those attending the Texas Business Conference.

Also, attorneys may receive up to six hours of Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) credit (no ethics hours) if they attend the entire conference. In addition, certified public accountants who attend can earn six hours of continuing education credit, and other conference participants may qualify for general professional credit.


Are San Antonio jobs affected by bad hires?

Friday, January 5th, 2018

A new Careerbuilder survey posits that San Antonio jobs may be affected by making even one bad hire.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, companies lost an average of $14,900 on every bad hire in the last year, and it’s a common mistake — nearly three in four employers (74 percent) say they’ve hired the wrong person for a position.

When asked how a bad hire affected their business in the last year, employers cited less productivity (37 percent), lost time to recruit and train another worker (32 percent) and compromised quality of work (31 percent).

How do you know if you’ve hired the wrong person? When asked what made them think they had made the wrong decision, employers who have made a bad hire said:

  • While the candidate didn’t have all the needed skills, thought they could learn quickly: 35 percent
  • Candidate lied about his/her qualifications: 33 percent
  • Took a chance on a nice person: 32 percent
  • Pressured to fill the role quickly: 30 percent
  • Had a hard time finding qualified candidates: 29 percent
  • Focused on skills and not attitude: 29 percent
  • Ignored some of the warning signs: 25 percent
  • Lacked adequate tools to find the right person: 10 percent
  • Didn’t do a complete background check: 10 percent
  • Didn’t work close enough with HR: 7 percent

Overall, this is how employers categorize someone as a bad hire:

  • The worker didn’t produce the proper quality of work: 54 percent
  • The worker had a negative attitude: 53 percent
  • The worker didn’t work well with other workers: 50 percent
  • The worker had immediate attendance problems: 46 percent
  • The worker’s skills did not match what they claimed to be able to do when hired: 45 percent