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Archive for February, 2018

You may not need a degree for some San Antonio jobs

Wednesday, February 7th, 2018

According to a recent Georgetown research survey, there are several great San Antonio jobs that you don’t even need a degree for – among other locations.

State-level analysis of the 30 million good jobs in the economy for those with less than a bachelor’s degree (B.A.) finds that nearly half of states have added good blue-collar jobs that pay without bachelor’s degrees.

Good Jobs That Pay without a B.A.: A State-by-State Analysis finds that 34 states added good non-BA jobs between 1991 and 2015. Texas, Arizona, and states in the South and West experienced the fastest growth in these jobs.

The report also identifies variation among good jobs gains and losses by industry and education across all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Manufacturing declined in 38 states and dominated job losses in 14 of the 16 states that lost good jobs overall. Yet, 23 states gained good bluecollar jobs that pay without B.A.s in industries, such as construction and transportation.

Nationally, a gain of 4 million good jobs in skilled-services industries, such as financial services and health services, more than offset the 2.5 million good jobs lost in manufacturing. States in the West and Upper Plains experienced the largest percentage gains in skilled-services good jobs, with especially strong growth in Arizona, Montana, Idaho, and North Dakota. Other states, primarily in the Northeast and Midwest, experienced much slower growth in skilled-service employment than the national average.

Every state experienced a shift in education requirements from high school diplomas or less to some college or associate’s degrees.

Associate’s degree holders in Minnesota increased their share of good jobs the most in the country, expanding by31 percentage points from 1991 to 2015. While high school graduates held more than half of the good jobs for those without B.A.s in 20 states in 1991, by 2015 that was only true in two states: Delaware and West Virginia.

Will employers be hiring for San Antonio jobs?

Wednesday, February 7th, 2018

Some employers may be hiring for San Antonio jobs in the new quarter, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

CareerBuilder’s annual forecast shows that 44 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees in the New Year and half (51 percent) will hire temporary employees.

Forty-five percent of HR managers currently have jobs they cannot fill because they cannot find qualified talent and 58 percent report that they have jobs that stay open for 12 weeks or longer.

The amount of employers planning to hire full-time, permanent staff in the New Year was similar to last year, increasing four percentage points from 40 percent in 2017 to 44 percent in 2018. Six percent of employers expect a decline in staff levels in 2018, an improvement from 8 percent last year. Forty-five percent anticipated no change while 5 percent were unsure.

While employers say functions such as customer service, sales, information technology and production will top their list for full-time, permanent hiring in 2018, they also pointed to other key areas where they will be adding headcount:

  • Jobs tied to skilled labor – 30 percent
  • Jobs tied to data analysis – 25 percent
  • Jobs tied to digital marketing – 17 percent
  • Jobs tied to cybersecurity – 15 percent
  • Jobs tied to automation – 12 percent
  • Jobs tied to artificial intelligence and machine learning – 10 percent

 

Could proposed rule affect healthcare at San Antonio jobs?

Sunday, February 4th, 2018

A new proposed rule regarding healthcare has been introduced that may affect San Antonio jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to expand the opportunity to offer employment-based health insurance to small businesses through Small Business Health Plans, also known as Association Health Plans.

According to the proposal, up to 11 million Americans working for small businesses/sole proprietors and their families lack employer-sponsored insurance. These 11 million Americans could find coverage under this proposal. Many small employers struggle to offer insurance because it is currently too expensive and cumbersome. These employees – and their families – would have an additional alternative through Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans). These plans would close the gap of uninsured without eliminating options available in the healthcare marketplace.

Under the proposal, small businesses and sole proprietors would have more freedom to band together to provide affordable, quality health insurance for employees.

The proposed rule, which applies only to employer-sponsored health insurance, would allow employers to join together as a single group to purchase insurance in the large group market. These improvements stand to open health insurance coverage for millions of Americans and their families by making it more affordable for thousands of small businesses and sole proprietors. By joining together, employers may reduce administrative costs through economies of scale, strengthen their bargaining position to obtain more favorable deals, enhance their ability to self-insure, and offer a wider array of insurance options.

As proposed, the rule would:

  • Allow employers to form a Small Business Health Plan on the basis of geography or industry. A plan could serve employers in a state, city, county, or a multi-state metro area, or it could serve all the businesses in a particular industry nationwide;
  • Allow sole proprietors to join Small Business Health Plans, clearing a path to access health insurance for the millions of uninsured Americans who are sole proprietors or the family of sole proprietors.

The proposed rule includes important protections for Americans. Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans) cannot charge individuals higher premiums based on health factors or refuse to admit employees to a plan because of health factors. The Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration will closely monitor these plans to protect consumers.