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Construction jobs in San Antonio grow

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Construction jobs in San Antonio are climbing, according to the latest employment data from ADP.

Private sector employment increased by 214,000 jobs from January to February according to the February ADP National Employment Report.

Payrolls for businesses with 49 or fewer employees increased by 76,000 jobs in February, in line with January’s downwardly revised 75,000.

Employment among companies with 50-499 employees increased by 62,000 jobs, down from January’s downwardly revised 74,000.

Employment at large companies – those with 500 or more employees – came in at 76,000, a big jump from January’s 44,000. Companies with 500-999 added 14,000 jobs, while companies with over 1,000 employees gained 62,000 jobs.

Goods-producing employment rose by 5,000 jobs in February, just over a quarter of January’s upwardly revised 19,000.

The construction industry added 27,000 jobs, which was slightly above January’s upwardly revised 26,000.

Meanwhile, manufacturing lost 9,000 jobs, the second largest drop in five years. Service-providing employment rose by 208,000 jobs in February, up from a downwardly revised 174,000 in January.

The ADP National Employment Report indicates that professional/business services contributed 59,000 jobs, up sharply from January’s downwardly revised 38,000.

Trade/transportation/utilities grew by 20,000, down from a downwardly revised 26,000 the previous month. The 8,000 new jobs added in financial activities were the least in that sector since August 2015.

“Large businesses showed surprisingly strong job gains in February, despite the continuation of economic trends that negatively impact big companies like turmoil in international markets and a strengthening dollar,” said Ahu Yildirmaz, VP and head of the ADP Research Institute. “The gains were mostly driven by the service sector which accounted for almost all the jobs added by large businesses.” Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody’s Analytics, said.