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Will employers be hiring for San Antonio jobs?

February 7th, 2018

Some employers may be hiring for San Antonio jobs in the new quarter, according to a recent survey from Careerbuilder.

CareerBuilder’s annual forecast shows that 44 percent of employers plan to hire full-time, permanent employees in the New Year and half (51 percent) will hire temporary employees.

Forty-five percent of HR managers currently have jobs they cannot fill because they cannot find qualified talent and 58 percent report that they have jobs that stay open for 12 weeks or longer.

The amount of employers planning to hire full-time, permanent staff in the New Year was similar to last year, increasing four percentage points from 40 percent in 2017 to 44 percent in 2018. Six percent of employers expect a decline in staff levels in 2018, an improvement from 8 percent last year. Forty-five percent anticipated no change while 5 percent were unsure.

While employers say functions such as customer service, sales, information technology and production will top their list for full-time, permanent hiring in 2018, they also pointed to other key areas where they will be adding headcount:

  • Jobs tied to skilled labor – 30 percent
  • Jobs tied to data analysis – 25 percent
  • Jobs tied to digital marketing – 17 percent
  • Jobs tied to cybersecurity – 15 percent
  • Jobs tied to automation – 12 percent
  • Jobs tied to artificial intelligence and machine learning – 10 percent

 

Could proposed rule affect healthcare at San Antonio jobs?

February 4th, 2018

A new proposed rule regarding healthcare has been introduced that may affect San Antonio jobs.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to expand the opportunity to offer employment-based health insurance to small businesses through Small Business Health Plans, also known as Association Health Plans.

According to the proposal, up to 11 million Americans working for small businesses/sole proprietors and their families lack employer-sponsored insurance. These 11 million Americans could find coverage under this proposal. Many small employers struggle to offer insurance because it is currently too expensive and cumbersome. These employees – and their families – would have an additional alternative through Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans). These plans would close the gap of uninsured without eliminating options available in the healthcare marketplace.

Under the proposal, small businesses and sole proprietors would have more freedom to band together to provide affordable, quality health insurance for employees.

The proposed rule, which applies only to employer-sponsored health insurance, would allow employers to join together as a single group to purchase insurance in the large group market. These improvements stand to open health insurance coverage for millions of Americans and their families by making it more affordable for thousands of small businesses and sole proprietors. By joining together, employers may reduce administrative costs through economies of scale, strengthen their bargaining position to obtain more favorable deals, enhance their ability to self-insure, and offer a wider array of insurance options.

As proposed, the rule would:

  • Allow employers to form a Small Business Health Plan on the basis of geography or industry. A plan could serve employers in a state, city, county, or a multi-state metro area, or it could serve all the businesses in a particular industry nationwide;
  • Allow sole proprietors to join Small Business Health Plans, clearing a path to access health insurance for the millions of uninsured Americans who are sole proprietors or the family of sole proprietors.

The proposed rule includes important protections for Americans. Small Business Health Plans (Association Health Plans) cannot charge individuals higher premiums based on health factors or refuse to admit employees to a plan because of health factors. The Department of Labor’s Employee Benefits Security Administration will closely monitor these plans to protect consumers.

San Antonio education jobs added

January 7th, 2018

A number of San Antonio education jobs have been added, according to recent labor statistics.

Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell to 3.8 percent, setting a new record for the lowest unemployment rate recorded in four decades. The Texas economy added 54,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs in November. Annual employment growth for Texas increased to 2.7 percent in November, marking 91 consecutive months of annual growth.

 

“The addition of 330,600 jobs over the year demonstrates the consistency with which employers in our state create job opportunities for the highly skilled Texas workforce,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar. “The Texas economy offers employers access to a competitive workforce and provides job seekers with career options in a variety of growing Texas industries.”

Nine of eleven major industries showed increased growth in November, including Professional and Business Services with 14,700 jobs added and Construction which added 8,200 positions. Leisure and Hospitality employment continued to grow by adding 8,000 jobs in November.

Employment in Education and Health Services increased by 8,200 positions. Over the year, this industry has gained 40,400 jobs. Trade, Transportation, and Utilities employment grew by 8,200 jobs, and Manufacturing industry jobs increased by 2,700 positions.

“Private-sector employers added 52,000 jobs in November and have accounted for the addition of 294,600 positions in Texas over the past year,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “I am encouraged by the growth across a variety of industries and commend our employers for their investment in our Texas workforce.”

The Amarillo and Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.6 percent, followed by the Austin-Round Rock, College Station-Bryan and Lubbock MSAs with a rate of 2.7 percent. The San Antonio-New Braunfels MSA registered a rate of 3.0 percent for November.

“Employment demand continues to be high in well-paying industries such as Manufacturing, Construction, and Mining and Logging,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “I encourage career exploration in these and other industries that are growing in Texas. TWC’s labor market information tools and products are designed to inform, prepare and advance our Texas workforce.”

 

Conferences spotlight San Antonio human resource jobs

January 7th, 2018

A number of conferences that will be in new in 2018 are spotlighting San Antonio jobs, among other locations.

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) has announced its 2018 Texas Business Conference schedule with 16 locations available throughout the state.

The conferences offer employers and human resource professionals the opportunity to earn education credits, learn about new employment laws, network with peers, and talk one-on-one with employment attorneys.

TWC invites area employers, human resource professionals, business owners and managers to attend the conferences, which will provide valuable information for employers and business owners concerning the legal issues associated with operating a business in Texas.

“We are committed to providing employers with the information they need to succeed,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “Our new season of Texas Business Conferences brings valuable resources to help employers effectively navigate through state and federal employment laws.”

Employers receive practical, up-to-date information for operating a successful business and learn techniques to more effectively manage employees.

Seminar topics include: Texas employment law and the basics of hiring; federal and Texas wage and hour laws; the unemployment claim and appeal process; independent contractors; and employee policy handbooks. Participants will receive the latest edition of the popular publication, Especially for Texas Employers, which addresses basic legal issues regarding hiring, pay, post-employment and work-separation policies.

The Society for Human Resource Management Texas State Council (Texas SHRM) is co-sponsoring the Texas Business Conferences and offering professional development and Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) recertification credits for human resources professionals attending the conferences.

Certificates for the Texas SHRM Professional Development Credits will be handed out to those attending the Texas Business Conference.

Also, attorneys may receive up to six hours of Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE) credit (no ethics hours) if they attend the entire conference. In addition, certified public accountants who attend can earn six hours of continuing education credit, and other conference participants may qualify for general professional credit.

 

Are San Antonio jobs affected by bad hires?

January 5th, 2018

A new Careerbuilder survey posits that San Antonio jobs may be affected by making even one bad hire.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, companies lost an average of $14,900 on every bad hire in the last year, and it’s a common mistake — nearly three in four employers (74 percent) say they’ve hired the wrong person for a position.

When asked how a bad hire affected their business in the last year, employers cited less productivity (37 percent), lost time to recruit and train another worker (32 percent) and compromised quality of work (31 percent).

How do you know if you’ve hired the wrong person? When asked what made them think they had made the wrong decision, employers who have made a bad hire said:

  • While the candidate didn’t have all the needed skills, thought they could learn quickly: 35 percent
  • Candidate lied about his/her qualifications: 33 percent
  • Took a chance on a nice person: 32 percent
  • Pressured to fill the role quickly: 30 percent
  • Had a hard time finding qualified candidates: 29 percent
  • Focused on skills and not attitude: 29 percent
  • Ignored some of the warning signs: 25 percent
  • Lacked adequate tools to find the right person: 10 percent
  • Didn’t do a complete background check: 10 percent
  • Didn’t work close enough with HR: 7 percent

Overall, this is how employers categorize someone as a bad hire:

  • The worker didn’t produce the proper quality of work: 54 percent
  • The worker had a negative attitude: 53 percent
  • The worker didn’t work well with other workers: 50 percent
  • The worker had immediate attendance problems: 46 percent
  • The worker’s skills did not match what they claimed to be able to do when hired: 45 percent

 

Dropout pilot prevention programs and San Antonio jobs

December 8th, 2017

New dropout pilot prevention programs will help keep kids at school and in line to get San Antonio jobs.

The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) recently announced the award of $1.5 million in funding for the Foster Youth Dropout Recovery and High School Completion pilot program to help current and former foster youth ages 16 to 25 earn a high school diploma or its equivalent, and obtain high-demand workforce skills with the goal of ensuring that this vulnerable population has a pathway to postsecondary education or employment in high-demand occupations.

This initiative was included among the recommendations of the Tri-Agency Report to the Governor: Prosperity Requires Being Bold: Integrating Education and the Workforce for a Bright Texas Future released in 2016. Commissioners from TWC, the Texas Education Agency and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board identified a need to support foster youth among major initiatives included in statewide efforts for the next generation that will make Texas the clear leader in targeted fields and position the state for future economic success.

“These Foster Youth pilots will demonstrate how we can work in partnership to enhance postsecondary outcomes for former foster students by increasing their rates of high school completion, high-demand skills attainment, and postsecondary enrollment,” said TWC Chairman Andres Alcantar.

The $1.5 million will be used to create four 18- to 24-month high school completion pilot programs for current and former foster youth that will support internships, applied learning opportunities, and offer support services for postsecondary education and training opportunities.

“The pilot program will not only assist foster care youth in becoming independent adults, but will help meet the growing demand for skilled workers and provide an additional talent pipeline for our Texas employers,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs

Is San Antonio unemployment on the decline?

December 8th, 2017

New labor statistics show that San Antonio unemployment rates may be declining.

he Texas economy added 71,500 seasonally adjusted nonfarm jobs in October. Annual employment growth for Texas was 2.6 percent in October, marking 90 consecutive months of annual growth. Texas’ seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell to 3.9 percent, setting a record for the lowest unemployment rate recorded in four decades.

 

Leisure and Hospitality employment rebounded by adding 34,700 jobs in October after experiencing its largest monthly decline in September due to hurricane-affected business closures.

Over the year, this industry has gained 41,000 jobs. Trade, Transportation, and Utilities employment grew by 10,300 jobs, and Professional and Business Services expanded by 6,300 jobs.

“Private-sector employers added 64,100 jobs in October and have accounted for the addition of 279,300 positions in Texas over the past year as the state has continued to expand its employment,” said TWC Commissioner Representing Employers Ruth R. Hughs. “I invite Texas employers to participate in the We Hire Vets recognition program to recognize them for their commitment to hiring our nation’s heroes.”

The Amarillo and Midland Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA) recorded the month’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.4 percent, followed by the College Station-Bryan MSA with a rate of 2.5 percent. The Austin-Round Rock and Lubbock MSAs registered a rate of 2.6 percent for October.

“Several Goods Producing industries are showing strength in Texas, including Construction, which expanded by 4,500 jobs in October” said TWC Commissioner Representing Labor Julian Alvarez. “In recognition of Texas Apprenticeship Week this week, I encourage our labor force to tap into TWC’s apprenticeship training program that can help prepare them for a well-paying career.”

 

Texas adds tech jobs in San Antonio

December 8th, 2017

Texas has been busy adding more tech jobs in San Antonio.

Texas’s technology industry added more than 11,000 new jobs in 2016, according to Cyberstates 2017the annual analysis of the nation’s tech industry released by CompTIA.

With an estimated 593,000 workers, Texas ranks second among the 50 states for tech industry employment.

Technology occupations across all other industries in Texas – the second component of the tech workforce – reached an estimated 626,300 in 2016.

The tech sector accounts for an estimated 7.2 ($117.2 billion) percent of the overall Texas economy.

The annualized average wage for a Texas tech industry worker was an estimated $102,300 in 2016, 89 percent higher than the average state wage ($54,100). Texas ranks 13th nationally in average tech industry wages.

  • In 2016 Texas led the nation by a wide margin in the number of new tech business establishments created (911). The state is now home to an estimated 36,245 tech business establishments.
  • Texas also leads the country in the telecommunications services; computer, peripheral and software wholesalers; and computer and electronic repairs sectors of the industry.
  • The tech industry employs an estimated 5.1 percent of the overall Texas workforce.
  • Leading tech occupations include computer system analysts (65,310), computer user support specialists (62,760) and application software developers (56,430).
  • The strongest year-over-year job growth occurred in the categories of computer systems design and IT services (+ 7.2 percent) and R&D and testing labs (+ 4 percent).
  • State employers posted more than 42,600 job openings for tech occupations in Q4 2016.

San Antonio customer service jobs grow

November 8th, 2017

JCPenney’s is hiring and may possibly increase the number of San Antonio customer service jobs.

JCPenney is planning to hire over 40,000 associates this holiday season – comparable to last year.

The company is seeking to fill a variety of positions in stores, jcpenney.com facilities and customer care centers across the country.

They typically begin increasing staffing levels in early October, and continue hiring efforts throughout the holiday season.

The company is seeking a variety of customer service and support positions, including cashier, replenishment specialist, SEPHORA inside JCPenney beauty consultant, salon stylist and more.

All skill levels are welcome, and candidates are encouraged to apply online at jcpcareers.com or in-store at one of the applicant kiosks prior to attending the event.

The company is  introducing a JCPenney National Hiring Day in stores on Oct. 17.

The events will take place at all JCPenney locations nationwide from 2-8 p.m. local time that day, where management will be holding in-person interviews and making employment offers to candidates on-the-spot.

Company hiring for retail jobs in San Antonio

November 7th, 2017

Macy’s is hiring for the holidays and make be looking to fill retail jobs in San Antonio.

The company plans to hire approximately 80,000 seasonal associates for positions at its Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s stores, call centers, distribution centers and online fulfillment centers nationwide for the 2017 Christmas and holiday season.

Macy’s, Inc.’s 2017 seasonal hiring plan includes the following:

  • About 18,000 of the 80,000 total seasonal positions will be based in direct-to-consumer fulfillment facilities that support sales generated by the company’s omnichannel business strategy. This is an increase of 3,000 positions compared to 2016. These positions are located in megacenters in Goodyear, AZ; Cheshire, CT; Tulsa, OK; Portland, TN; and Martinsburg, WV, as well as in product-specific fulfillment centers in Sacramento, CA; Stone Mountain, GA; Secaucus, NJ; and Joppa, MD.
  • Approximately 1,000 associates will be hired to interact with customers via telephone, email and online chat at customer service centers in Mason, OH; Clearwater, FL; and Tempe, AZ.
  • More than 1,000 people will be hired across the country to support the 91st annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, Santalands and other iconic holiday events.

Seasonal associates at Macy’s and Bloomingdale’s serve customers on the selling floor, work in store operations positions, interact with customers via call centers, and staff the distribution and fulfillment centers that coordinate shipments to stores and directly to customers who buy online or via mobile. Macy’s, Inc. is one of the largest online retailers in America. Most seasonal positions are part-time, often with flexibility to fit the availability of the individuals hired.