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Staying out of politics and San Antonio jobs

Sunday, July 31st, 2016

It may be important to keep politics away from the workplace at San Antonio jobs, according to a recent Careerbuilder survey.

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, 3 in 10 employers (30 percent) and nearly 1 in 5 employees (17 percent) have argued with a co-worker over a particular candidate this election season, most often about presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump.

Overall, 19 percent of employers have argued with a co-worker over Donald Trump vs. 17 percent over Hillary Clinton. While both male and female employers say they have debated with a co-worker over Trump most (22 percent of men, 16 percent of women), men are nearly twice as likely as women to say they’ve argued with a co-worker over Clinton (21 percent vs. 11 percent).

When it comes to employees, 13 percent have argued with a co-worker over Donald Trump and 8 percent have argued over Hillary Clinton. Male employees (20 percent) reported a higher incidence of arguing politics at work than female employees (15 percent). Comparing age groups, younger workers (ages 18-24) are the most likely to report engaging in heated political debates at work at 24 percent.

Workers are often urged to remain politically correct, but according to most, their workplaces are censoring them too much. Half of workers (50 percent) and nearly 6 in 10 employers (59 percent) believe the workplace has become too politically correct in America, and a third of employees (33 percent) are afraid to voice certain opinions because they feel they may not be considered politically correct.

More than half of workers (55 percent) describe their workplace or management (59 percent) as politically correct.

And although more than a fifth of workers (22 percent) say political correctness has made their business stronger, more than a third (34 percent) say it has hindered business, making people tiptoe around issues and afraid to speak their minds instead of addressing the issues head on.

While most workers choose to keep political debates outside of the workplace, those who like a little healthy debate should keep it at that – healthy. To avoid letting political talk turn sour, Haefner says managers should:

  • Recognize there’s a thin line between freedom of expression and a potential source of conflict. Consider providing respect and dignity behavioral training to all employees and emphasize tolerance for different ideas, beliefs and needs.
  • Ensure your harassment policies and harassment complaint system are posted and that employees are trained in the process. Similarly, make sure employees are aware of any guidelines that prohibit bringing campaign materials into the office.
  • Create a culture of open dialogue and mutual respect, but if conversations do turn heated, encourage employees to walk away.