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The ideal candidate for San Antonio jobs

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2016

Monster.com has just released a small business survey describing the ideal candidate for San Antonio jobs, among other locations.

While many of today’s small business owners continue to devote more of their own time and effort to finding the ideal candidate, some are actually not improving their search whatsoever. Of those who have hired the wrong person before, 56 percent are investing more time to make sure they don’t do this again, but only about one in five aren’t doing anything at all (18 percent).

Although nine in ten (89 percent) small business owners find the hiring process time consuming and three-fifths (61 percent) wish they had more help in finding the right person for the job, significantly fewer owners are currently hiring an outside service to help recruit (11 percent). Monster’s goal is to make small business owners aware that these resources and solutions exist, all within their budget.

“Monster has been able to reach the type of person we want, in the way they’re searching for jobs, be it a smart phone, social sites,” said Brian Bailey, co-founder of Old Carolina Barbecue company, another of Monster’s small business customers.

In addition to being a financial burden, hiring the wrong person can have an emotional effect on small business owners. About three in four owners who have hired the wrong person before feel frustrated (73 percent), stressed (47 percent) and discouraged (36 percent) as a result. The survey also found that:

  • Over half of those who have hired the wrong person before have experienced a loss of time (69 percent) and money (56 percent) due to wrong hires.
  • Specifically, one-third or more of these owners estimate wasting over 50 hours of their time (34 percent) and over $1,000 (42 percent) due to their most recent wrong hire.
  • Other issues caused by hiring the wrong person include product errors (51 percent) and loss of customers (24 percent).